Introvert Hangovers, Yes, It’s A Real Thing. 12 Signs You Need To Rest And Recharge.

It might sound strange at first but introvert hangovers are a real thing.

If you’re an introvert you’ve probably experienced this dreadful state more than once.

Maybe this will ring a bell or two:

You’ve just spent the whole day with your family, the day is almost done and you’re exhausted, so exhausted you can barely string a sentence together. You’re mentally, physically and emotionally done and there doesn’t seem to be any more energy left for you to muster up, not even the reserve batch in your big toe is seeming to work. Everyone else is still going and they’re showing no signs of stopping, anytime soon. You’re even considering using matches to keep your eyes open. What’s going on with you?

It’s not like you don’t love your family it’s just that most time, after socializing for a whole day you feel as though you’ve just partook in a cross country marathon.

Well, I’m here to tell you that there’s nothing wrong with you and that you’re not alone.

Many introverts experience the same thing after big social events, it’s now been given the very fitting name, ‘Introvert Hangover’ because it usually feels like you’ve either been out drinking all night or you’ve just done some strenuous workout.

To put it simply, its a form of fatigue with very real physical and emotional effects.

Below are 12 signs which indicate you may be experiencing an introvert hangover.

1. You are easily irritated and everything is getting on your nerves.

It’s so bad, even the dress you were happy putting on this morning is working on your nerves. When you have an introvert hangover you end up getting annoyed with the smallest of things. Normally when you leave your keys in the wrong place or misplace your partner makes a snarky comment you react with slight irritation. However, when you’re exhausted from this kind of hangover you end up reacting in a manner that is completely unnecessary. You raise your voice, tears flow and you’re virtually on the verse of a mental breakdown. Exhaustion can lead to fights within even the most loving relationships.

2. No matter how hard you try you literally cannot make any decisions for yourself.

To take a jumper or to not take a jumper? This is the most pressing decision ever. The decision shouldn’t be so hard but for some reason it is. Just thinking about making a decision is making you even more tired than you were before you had to make the decision and the reason being is that when you are mentally exhausted it’s near impossible to make a well thought out decision.

3. Your mind is foggy and you can’t think clearly.

Much like point #2 your brain is mentally tired and your brain feels like porridge. You struggle to keep your train of thought on track and remembering simple things you ought to know is proving to be the most difficult thing ever.

4. You start communicating like an alien from outta space

Your speech begins to change. You slur your words and jumble your sentences, ‘During December’ becomes ‘durincember’ and trying to think of the correct way to say ‘During December’ makes you even more irritated and exhausted you eventually give up and decide to let them decipher your newly found code.

5. You get headaches and sometimes feel uneasy in your tummy

Exhaustion can lead to many physical traits like headaches, dizziness, muscle spasms and even an upset tummy. When this happens it basically your body telling you to get some rest.

6. You’re tired, like really really tired.

This is not just your usual fatigue, it’s a mental, emotional and physical fatigue. The kind that makes you want to sleep and never wake up again. You become snappy and emotional, you avoid love stories and animals videos because you end up balling your eyes out. You become overly sensitive and if someone dares offend you it will be their head!

7. You zone out for more than 10 seconds at a time.

You lose interest in the world around you and end up venturing into your own world for minutes on end. It doesn’t matter where you are or what you’re doing you almost always have a minimum 15sec zone out with either frown or blank stare. Most of the time you’re thinking about nothing and then other times you’re deep in thought about absurd things like, whether ants in America speak to each other in English and whether ants in Spain talk to each other in Spanish.

8. Anxiety becomes your arch nemesis.

For most introverts, an introvert hangover brings out the worst of their anxiety because being so exhausted makes them even more nervous. You start worrying that you’ll say the wrong thing or snap for no apparent reason.

9. You start feeling slightly depressed.

All you want to do is recluse and rest but because life sometimes requires you to be in a social situation you end up experiencing slight depression. Your thoughts and outlook on life becomes negative and cynical.

10. You are clearly not your normal self.

Friends, co-workers and family can see that somethings up, not everyone knows you’re an introvert so they can’t necessarily pinpoint what’s wrong but there’s a definite change in behaviour within you.

11. Your small talk isn’t polite anymore.

No matter how hard you try you just can’t seem to keep a smile on your face while engaging in boring, pointless small talk.

12. More than anything else, you desire to be alone.

The thing that makes introverts so different to extroverts is the insatiable desire to be alone. It’s a vital part of healing and recharging. So when you’re experiencing an introvert hangover all that really matters is your own space, favourite book or TV show and comfort food. No other humans, at all.

Self-love and self-care is the most important thing we as humans can do for ourselves. So if you feel the need to leave the party early because you are exhausted, leave! You need to always do what’s best for your wellbeing. Recharge and then face the new day with renewed energy.

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