Zookeepers self-isolate in a wildlife park for 12 weeks to look after the animals

Zookeepers from Cornwall, UK, have self-isolated themselves into a wildlife sanctuary for 12 weeks, so they can look after the animals during the quarantine.

Cornwall’s sanctuary Paradice Park is home to 1,200 birds and mammals. Now, the family extends with the dedicated zookeepers Sarah-Jane, Layla, Izzy, and Emily. Initially, they were three, but Layla joined a few days later. The four kindhearted staff members have decided to move to the wildlife park, away from their families, so they continue to care for the animals.

Last weekend, the sanctuary closed its doors to help prevent the spread of coronavirus.

However, the staff knew that the many animals the park is home to, such as red pandas, penguins, flamingos, and parrots, will need to be taken care of during the isolation. That’s why they set up residence to help look after them.

Keeper Sarah-Jane feeding Scarlet the Red Panda with some panda cake this morning 🙂

Posted by Paradise Park on Wednesday, March 25, 2020

Of course, Sarah-Jane, Layla, Izzy, and Emily aren’t sleeping with the animals.

They have a cozy house on site, with a room for each one of them, plus a lounge room and a little kitchen. 

On their official Facebook page, Paradise Park announced the staff member’s decision to become the sanctuary’s new semi-permanent residents:

“As we reach the point when the Park temporarily closes, everything is in place to ensure the birds and animals will be fed and cared for and have enriching opportunities every day.
Three of our Keepers Izzy, Emily and Sarah-Jane have volunteered to move in at the Park for which we are very grateful. They are leaving their families, some of whom are following 12 week self-isolation periods. They will be supported by other Keepers on a daily basis, observing all the relevant guidelines.”

As we reach the point when the Park temporarily closes, everything is in place to ensure the birds and animals will be…

Posted by Paradise Park on Friday, March 20, 2020

Unfortunately, the keepers are going to live away from their families for at least three months. However, they are going to be quite busy with their new roommates by taking care of them and following their usual routines. Hopefully, hanging out with their new furry friends will help them easily get through the isolation.

This is the first time the wildlife park has closed its doors to the public, apart from Christmas Day and a few snowy days.

The re-opening date is still unknown, and this worries every member of the staff.

Alison Hales, the Paradise Park director, explained the situation in a Facebook post:

“The unknown is very worrying. Spring is usually a hopeful time where we get an influx of visitors and we can breathe a sigh of relief.
It is now as if the rug has been pulled. I’m sure we will be ok. We are relying on the birds to show us the way. We will come out the other end.”

Hello everyone,Spring is usually a hopeful time where we get an influx of visitors and we can breathe a sigh of…

Posted by Paradise Park on Wednesday, March 25, 2020

Alison Hales and Michelle Turton, one of the staff members, have created a GoFundMe page. They are hoping kind donators will help Paradise Park with buying food for the birds and mammals and covering veterinary bills.

Self-isolating zookeepers

🐧🐼These zookeepers are self-isolating in their wildlife park to ensure all the animals are feed and watered 🥰

Posted by BBC Breakfast on Friday, March 27, 2020

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