The Pope Warns Of Second ‘Great Flood’ Caused By Climate Change

The Pope is warning us that we are on the verge of a second ‘great flood’ caused by climate change.

Pope Francis, 84, believes that God will once again be punishing humanity with a great flood just like he did in the bible.

He has also said that unless the world’s leaders begin to deal with corruption and injustice properly, we are to face another ‘great deluge, perhaps due to a rise in temperature and the melting of glaciers’.

These statements were made during an interview with Italian writer Marco Pozza in Corriere.

They talked about the pope’s new book Vice and Virtues, which urges the world to work towards the virtue of ‘prudence’, and encourages leaders to ‘stop and think’ before making rushed decisions.

Pope Francis told Pozza:

“God’s wrath is against injustice, against Satan. It is directed against evil, not that which derives from human weakness, but evil of Satanic inspiration: the corruption generated by Satan, behind which single men, single women, entire societies go. God’s wrath is meant to bring justice, ‘clean up’.

The flood is the result of God’s wrath , the Bible says. He is a figure of God’s wrath, who according to the Bible has seen too many bad things and decides to obliterate humanity.

The biblical one, according to experts, is a mythical tale. But myth is a form of knowledge. The flood is a historical tale, archaeologists say, because they found traces of a flood in their excavations.”

He added:

“A great deluge, perhaps due to a rise in temperature and the melting of glaciers: what will happen now if we continue on the same path. God unleashed his wrath, but he saw a righteous one, took him and saved him. The story of Noah demonstrates that God’s wrath is also a saviour.”

According to the United Nations Environment Programme, climate change increases the likelihood of floods. In addition, changes to land cover, like the removal of vegetation, can also increase the risk of floods.

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