Steve Irwin’s family have saved more than 90,000 animals, including many injured in the Australia wildfires

The disastrous wildfires have killed approximately over half a billion animals.

Steve Irwin’s family is making every possible effort to help animals suffering from the catastrophic brush fires burning across Australia.

Furthermore, Steve’s daughter, Bindi Irwin, is also sharing her support and doing everything she can to help. Recently she posted on Instagram:

“With so many devastating fires within Australia, my heart breaks for the people and wildlife who have lost so much. I wanted to let you know that we are SAFE. There are no fires near us at Australia Zoo or our conservation properties.”

At the Australia Zoo in Queensland and Wildlife Hospital the Irwin family owns, they took care of over 90,000 animals.

Many of these animals were victims of the brush fires. The Crocodile Hunter’s daughter is proudly continuing her father’s legacy by saving the lives of thousands of Australian wild animals. In fact, patient number 90,000 was little Ollie, an orphaned platypus. This lovely piece of information was shared by Bindi’s brother, Robert Irwin.

For months, the situation in Australia has been critical. The fires have been fueled by the extreme heatwave and the prolonged drought. Sadly, ecologists at the University of Sydney report that over half a billion animals have lost their lives, and whole ecosystems have collapsed in the fires.

Since the wildfires began in September 2019, at least 24 people have died, and roughly 2,000 homes have been destroyed, according to NBC News. Additionally, over 12 million acres of land have been scorched.

In her latest post, Bindi Irwin shares her gratitude to all the people that have prayed and showed their support to Australia in these tragic times.

“‪Thank you for your kind comments. Australia Zoo is safe from the bushfires however we are incredibly busy helping to treat wildlife who have been badly hurt during these devastating times.‪..
Together we can make a difference to help our planet in this time of devastation.‬”

The 21-year-old environmental activist also shares that her parents dedicated the Australia Zoo and Wildlife Hospital to her grandmother, Lyn Irwin and that her family will continue to “honour her by being Wildlife Warriors and saving as many lives as we can.”

The Irwins are continuing to do as much as they can to support the Australian’s wildlife.

View this post on Instagram

Thank you for your kind comments of support during these devastating Australian bushfires. Australia Zoo and our team are safe and far away from any of the fires. We are continuing to do as much we can to support our wildlife and wild places. We’re always so grateful when you visit us here at #AustraliaZoo as our profits go straight back into conservation. This is what Steve and Terri have always been so passionate about, giving everything they have to protect wildlife and their habitat. Our profits have gone towards securing nearly half a million acres of conservation property in Australia, protecting native species. We cover all administrative costs @wildlifewarriorsworldwide allowing every donation to go straight towards helping animals. We are the major sponsor funding the #AustraliaZooWildlifeHospital to care for over 90,000 wildlife patients. When you meet our cheetahs, rhinos or tigers at Australia Zoo the funds go towards supporting wild cheetah and rhino conservation work in Africa and employing a team of 60 rangers in Sumatra to dismantle illegal tiger snare traps. We’ve funded and participated in over 50 conservation studies, researching more about how to better protect our planet. Here at Australia Zoo we want to continue to make Steve proud by being Wildlife Warriors educating and inspiring others to make a difference while doing everything we can to protect our Mother Earth.

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