How to cope with panic attacks as a highly sensitive introvert

Being highly sensitive in today’s hostile world is almost an unbearable challenge. Only those who experience it can truly understand what it’s like to feel so much while being surrounded by people who don’t value the power of emotions.

When you are a highly sensitive person, you process feelings and emotions much more intensely than others.

Loud noises, too much talking, invasion of your personal space, and large crowds are only a few of the things that are enough to overwhelm you. In the meantime, you sense things no one else can, and your admirably high levels of empathy make you a great listener and an even greater friend.

However, you often feel emotionally exhausted exactly because others trust you with their personal issues. This happens because they usually don’t understand when venting is tolerable and when it starts violating your mental stability.

Unfortunately, feeling so much often leads to experiencing severe panic attacks. When you’re absorbing every single thing around you, you just can’t help but constantly feel on the verge of a breakdown. Even in situations when you are not anywhere near danger, your senses are trembling in a bid to protect your fragile soul.

So, to avoid always having your defense mechanism working, you take every opportunity possible to be alone.

If you are an introvert who feels physically clenched most of the time, you are also someone who deeply values their alone time. You perfectly realize that spending time in your own company does wonders for your mental health. It helps you recharge your batteries and get ready for another day of social interactions with people who don’t really comprehend the concept of high sensitivity.

What’s more, having quality time for yourself, away from anyone and anything that might affect your inner peace, can help you tremendously with dealing with panic attacks. For instance, you can try meditating, listening to calming sounds, or simply sitting in silence for a while. Sometimes, when you feel trapped, out of breath, and desperate all at the same time, distancing yourself might be exactly what you need to get through this.

On the other hand, being alone with your thoughts might harm you instead of help you overcome the attack. When all the stress, anxiety, and depression that usually haunt your mind hit you all at once, you inevitably become emotionally flooded. For a while, you feel vulnerable and helpless. It’s like your whole world is crashing down before your eyes. But if you have someone to explain all of your bottled feelings to, someone whom you trust and whose presence calms you down, you might be surprised at how getting things off your chest can help you understand your reactions.

Whatever works for you, whether spending time alone or venting to a loved one, you must know that being a highly sensitive introvert is not a weakness.

It is a gift that makes you special. It makes you special because you have a unique way of seeing, sensing, and perceiving things around you that others don’t have the emotional intelligence to understand.

Thankfully, the world is not entirely hostile to high sensitivity. In fact, it is gradually changing for the better, with millions of people agreeing that mental health is as important as physical health, and self-care is as crucial as building a career, for example. In the meantime, many of us have come to the conclusion that being “too sensitive” does not imply being weak. It means being empathetic, intuitive, and compassionate.

So next time you experience a panic attack, don’t forget to take care of your fragile mind. Whatever it is that will help you regain your composure, make sure it also helps you move forward. This way, the next time you have a similarly distressing experience, you will be able to go through it knowing that you have already survived it before.

And hopefully, you will eventually realize that being a highly sensitive introvert is not a curse – it’s a blessing!

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