Covidiot explains she has cut a hole in her face mask because it ‘makes it easier to breathe’

Convidiot in action: A woman with a hole in her protective face mask claimed it ‘makes it easier to breathe’.

Joe Samaan, an S J Food Mart employee, was on his workplace outside Lexington, Kentucky when the woman came in asking to pay for gas, Mail Online reveals. She was just a regular customer. However, her odd-looking face wear caught the employee’s attention. The woman was wearing a protective mask, but she had ripped a hole in it that left her mouth and nose exposed.

Image credits: Joe Samaan / TikTok

Samaan posted a TikTok video, showing the woman approaching the counter and asking if she can pay for gas for her car. As a decent employee, Joe does the customer’s transaction, but he was also curious about her bizarre decision. Samaan asked the woman where did she get that mask from, to which she replied:

“Well since we have to wear them and it makes it hard to breathe, this [cutting it] makes it a lot easier to breathe.”

The S J Food Mart worker was clearly shocked, so he asked if cutting the mask made it easier to breathe. The woman just nodded in agreement. 

Since Joe was quite dumbfounded by what he was witnessing, as the woman was leaving the store, he jokingly said:

“Yeah, sure I’ll do that too, thanks for the advice.”

Joe’s video has been viewed over 4.7 million times since it was posted last week. Most of the people who commented on the scene were stunned by the woman’s ignorance.

While we’re still battling with coronavirus, the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) urges all residents to continue wearing face masks in public. Additionally, Andrew Cuomo, the New York’s Governor, has ordered all residents to wear masks or other types of face coverings, in case they cannot stay 6ft apart.

Currently, in Kentucky, there are 5,245 confirmed COVID-19 cases, with 261 fatalities. On Sunday, Kentucky Governor Andy Beshear stated that the infection curve remains plateaued. He said:

“Overall, that number is, again, right around what we’ve been seeing, even though our testing has ramped up. It suggests, at the worst, we have plateaued.”

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