41-Year-Old Qualified Lawyer Sues Parents for Not Supporting Him Enough Financially

A London lawyer recently took his parents to court with the intention to force them to keep supporting him financially for as long as he wants.

According to the 41-year-old, who has not been identified, his parents had purposefully made him dependent on them for the past 20 years, only to now  ‘significantly reduce’ his cash flow after their relationship went downhill.

The man wanted the court to rule that his parents should keep on giving him money, and his lawyers cited legislation relating to children and marriage during a remote family hearing.

Strangely, the currently unemployed attorney is living without having to pay rent in a central London apartment owned by his mother and father.

In addition, his folks have been covering his utility bills, but evidently, that doesn’t do the job for him…

“His parents have supported him financially down the years and continue, to some extent, to do so,” Judge James Munby said.

“They have permitted him to live in a flat in central London, of which they are the registered proprietors, and in relation to which they have until recently been paying the utility bills.”

The judge added:

“Of late… the relationship between the applicant and his parents – in particular, it would appear, his father – has deteriorated and the financial support they are prepared to offer has significantly reduced. He characterizes their stance as seemingly being that, having in fact – whether wittingly or unwittingly – nurtured his dependency on them for the last 20 years or so – with the consequence that he is, so it is said, now completely dependent on them.”

His mom and dad, who are now living in Dubai, have asked for the case to be dismissed, which is precisely what happened, and the court noted that the man had no case and that future attempts should immediately be dismissed.

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